‘Give’ – Why it is not an Exception to Anything

We may have all seen some word wall or another which contains words that have to be memorized or learned by heart because they are irregular.  Some of the supposed irregular words include: have, give, said, they, come, their, and one.  They are considered irregular because there appears to be a mismatch between their spellings... Continue Reading →

C for chair and S for shoe: Understanding the difference between graphemes and letters

<b> <c>  <ch>   <d>  <f>  <g>  <gh>   <h> <j>   <k>   <kn->   <l>  <m>  <n> <-ng> <p> <ph> <r>  <s>   <sh>  <t>  <th>  <u>*   <v>  <w>   <y>*  <z> <-ck>  <-dg(e)>   <-tch>  <x>  <qu>  <wh->   <gu> <-ugh> <wr> <rh> <ai>/<ay>  <au>/<aw>  <ea> <ee>   <ei>/<ey>   <eu>/<ew> <ie> ... Continue Reading →

Be Friendly

The above matrix and word sums demonstrate (once again) the morphological nature of English vocabulary. Once you have established the correct spelling of the base <friend> : fri + end or f.r. (i)e.n.d as shown here you can used the above matrix and word sums to build on the words in this morphological family. This... Continue Reading →

English Phonology

Distribution of Phonemes English, like all other languages, has its unique phonological rules regarding the distribution of phonemes. These rules are called phonotactics. Phonotactics describe permissible sequence of phonemes in a language; such as which phonemes can (or cannot) occur in certain positions in words and which can or cannot cluster (combine).  For example, not... Continue Reading →

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