Just Playing with Words

The words <plays, played, player, playing, playful> are composed of bases and suffixes: <-s, -ed, -er, -ing, -ful> are suffixes. <Playmate, playlist, playground, play-date> are compound words  composed of two bases. Worried about students not having strong or rich vocabulary?Understanding and using morphology – bases and affixes – can provide the answer you need to... Continue Reading →

Good Writing Requires More Than Creativity

Both models represent the same information: the structure of language. However, each model creates a different mental picture because the visuals are different. The first model divides the structure of language into three broad components - pronunciation, grammar, meaning - before subdividing each component into two aspects. The units of language gets larger as you... Continue Reading →

From act to action

Morphological analyses and vocabulary development inter  +  act  --> interact inter  +  act  +  s  -->   interacts inter  +  act  +  ed  -->   interacted inter  +  act   +  ing  -->  interacting inter  +  act  +  ion  -->  interaction pro + act  +  ive  -->  proactive en  +  act  --> enact en  + act ... Continue Reading →

Learning from ‘please’

Word sums of the base<please> please + es  -->  pleases please + ed -->  pleased please + ing  --> pleasing please + er  -->  pleaser please + ure  --> pleasure please + ant  --> pleasant dis + please  -->  displease dis + please + es  --> displeases dis + please + ed  --> displeased dis... Continue Reading →

Interest

Word sum: Inter + est --> interest (The prefix + base gives us the stem <interest> ) <Interest> is a Latin word which was borrowed into English from French.  It literally meant “that which is between” – inter “between” +  est “to be”. It meant ‘to concern, or be of importance’. Word sums: Inter +... Continue Reading →

Writing the ‘sound’ /k/ in English

Before I begin, I would like to explain certain concepts to make it easier to read the post. I use the forward slashes // to enclose pronunciation, while the angle brackets <> enclose spelling. The term 'graphemes' means a spelling units. Graphemes represent distinct pronunciations. I enclose graphemes in angle brackets: <ck>, <c>, <k>, <qu>.... Continue Reading →

Making Sense of ‘t’ in English

English spelling and reading can sometimes present challenges due to some of the complexities of the grapheme-phoneme correspondences.  Several graphemes (spelling units) represent more than one pronunciation and a single pronunciation can be written using different graphemes.  However, the complexities of the grapheme-phoneme correspondences provide us with valuable information about words. How a word is... Continue Reading →

Working with ‘do’

Learning about a simple word like <do> and its various derivatives can teach us a lot about the importance of morphology in reading, spelling, and vocabulary development. The concept of morphemes is not something you wait until children are in junior high or upper elementary before you introduce. You cannot successfully analyze the phonemes (sounds)... Continue Reading →

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